Couzyn van Heuvelen Named to the 2018 Sobey Art Award Longlist

By | News

The Inuit Art Foundation is delighted to report that Iqaluit-born artist Couzyn van Heuvelen has been named to the 2018 Sobey Art Award longlist, Canada’s most prestigious award for young artists. The honour comes on the heels of several career milestones for the artist in recent years. “I’m very excited,” explained van Heuvelen when reached for comment. “It’s [something] that has been on my list of things I’d love to do, to get on the longlist. [But] it was kind of a far off goal. I didn’t think it would happen so soon.” Van Heuvelen is only the third Inuit artist to receive this honour. Read More

Flashback: Jessie Oonark

By | Feature

In the study of art, a seam in time can sometimes unexpectedly open, spilling a packet of the past. All the spark and vitality of a moment long passed has somehow been saved and can now be relived afresh. Such was the experience of eighty-two-year-old, New York-based writer and educator Richard Lewis, who was quietly performing that most monotonous of domestic chores—cleaning his basement—when he came across a manila envelope containing a blast from his past. Inside were 27 pristine drawings on coloured card stock, the work of the Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake), NU, artist Jessie Oonark, OC, RCA (1906–1985), drawings made with coloured pens when the artist was in her prime, in the late 1960s. Read More

Interview: Bart Hanna

By | Feature

In 2013, Bart Hanna completed his most ambitious sculpture to date: Migration, a monumental ship with a cast of unique characters carved from a single block of stone weighing over 700 pounds, retrieved more than 300 miles north of Iglulik (Igloolik), NU, outside of Ikpiarjuk (Arctic Bay). In this interview with IAF Executive Director Alysa Procida, Hanna explains the significance of this singular work. Read More

Lukie Airut: Igloolik’s Carving Wizard

By | Feature

After venturing out from their home community of lgloolik to hunt caribou and fetch relatives from an outpost camp, carver Lukie Airut and filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk take a detour through the frozen Fury and Hecla Strait, a narrow channel that runs between Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula. Airut suddenly revs his Ski-Doo snowmobile engine and bolts ahead, disappearing in the dim December light. Read More

Remembering Lukie Airut

By | Tribute

The Inuit Art Foundation is saddened to report the passing of Iglulik-based artist Lukie Airut (1942–2018), an immensely talented sculptor known for his intricate and multi-dimensional sculptures. Airut was born in an outpost camp on Baffin Island’s Alanarjuk Lake and later moved to Iglulik to study carving with artist Pacome Kolaut (1925–1968). Although skilled at working in stone, Airut eventually shifted his focus to whalebone and walrus ivory—media in which he excelled and that allowed him to create highly detailed works in increasing scale. Read More

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